Imparfait or Passé composé?

What’s the difference between the imparfait and the passé composé?

Most learners of French find it difficult to decide between the imparfait and the passé composé when talking about the past. Although both are past tenses, they are used in very different contexts and cannot be used interchangeably.

Master the difference between these two tricky tenses with the examples and explanations below, then put your knowledge to the test in the free exercises. To learn more about each of the tenses individually, go to the dedicated pages on the imparfait and the passé composé.

Example

L’année dernière, je suis allé au bord de la Loire pour les vacances. J’ai fait une randonnée à vélo. Tous les matins, je reprenais la route et chaque jour, je traversais plusieurs villages. Souvent, je m’arrêtais pour parler avec les villageois.

Mes amis préféraient passer les vacances au bord de la mer. Donc, pendant que je pédalais, ils étaient sûrement assis sur le sable.

Mais un jour, pendant que je parlais avec un agriculteur, j’ai reçu un appel. Mes amis m’appelaient pour me dire combien le temps était horrible à la mer. Ils passaient leurs journées à l’intérieur! J’ai raccroché et j’ai ri.

Advertisement

How to conjugate verbs in the imperfect and the passé composé

Imparfait

-er
-ir
(finir)*
-ir
(dormir)**
-re
j’aimais je finissais je dormais je vendais
tu aimais tu finissais tu dormais tu vendais
il aimait il finissait il dormait il vendait
nous aimions nous finissions nous dormions nous vendions
vous aimiez vous finissiez vous dormiez vous vendiez
ils aimaient ils finissaient ils dormaient ils vendaient

* Most ir-verbs are conjugated like finir. Choisir, réagir, réfléchir and réussir belong to this group. Here we add an -iss- to the word stem in the plural forms.

** Most ir-verbs that are not conjugated like finir, are conjugated like dormir. Mentir, partir and sentir are part of this group. We don't add -iss- to form the plural.

Passé composé

avoir Participle être Participle
j’ai

aimé

fini

vendu

je suis

parti

partie

partis

parties

tu as tu es
il/elle/on a il/elle/on est
nous avons nous sommes
vous avez vous êtes
ils/elles ont ils/elles sont

When to use the imperfect and when to use the passé composé?

Generally speaking, the passé composé corresponds to the English simple past; we usually use it with a time indicator to talk about completed, sequential or one-time actions that took place in the past.

In contrast, the imparfait corresponds to the past progressive or the structures used to and would. We use it for descriptions and setting the scene, as well as for ongoing or repeated past actions with an emphasis on duration.

The table below presents the key differences between these two tenses along with clear examples of each use.

Imparfait Passé composé

to describe a situation (weather, landscape, person) in the past

Example:
Mes amis m’appelaient pour me dire combien le temps était horrible à la mer.My friends called to tell me how horrible the weather was by the sea.

to talk about sudden actions in the past (e.g. an action that interrupted another)

Example:
J’ai reçu un appel.I received a call.

to emphasise the duration of an action

Example:
Ils passaient leurs journées à l’intérieur!They spent every day indoors!

to list past actions, often with a time indicator

Example:
L’année dernière, je suis allé au bord de la Loire pour les vacances.Last year I went to the Loire on holiday.

to talk about repeated past actions (used to, would)

Example:
Souvent, je m’arrêtais pour parler avec les villageois.I would often stop to chat with the villagers.

a completed one-time action in the past

Example:
J’ai fait une randonnée à vélo.I went on a bicycle tour.

to talk about simultaneously occurring actions in the past

Example:
Donc, pendant que je pédalais, ils étaient sûrement assis sur le sable.While I was cycling, they were surely sitting on the beach.

sequentially occurring actions in the past

Example:
J’ai raccroché et j’ai ri.I hung up and laughed.

to talk about an action that was already in progress in the past when a new action interrupted it

Example:
Mais un jour, pendant que je parlais avec un agriculteur, j’ai reçu un appel.But one day while I was talking to a farmer, I got a call.

new action in the past that interrupts another action that was already in progress

Example:
Mais un jour, pendant que je parlais avec un agriculteur, j’ai reçu un appel.But one day while I was talking to a farmer, I got a call.

Signal Words

Imparfait Passé composé
  • tous les joursevery day
  • chaque foisevery time
  • toujoursalways
  • ne … jamaisnever
  • souventoften
  • le mardion Tuesdays
  • d’habitudeusually
  • quelquefoissometimes
  • soudainsuddenly
  • tout à coupsuddenly
  • à ce moment-làat that time
  • en 1998in 1988
  • hieryesterday
  • l’année dernièrelast year
  • ensuitethen, next
  • puisthen
  • aprèsafter, afterwards, next
  • alorsthen

To Note

The difference between the imparfait and the passé composé can also be applied to the imparfait/passé simple, since the passé composé and the passé simple function in similar ways. The passé composé is used more often in spoken language, while the passé simple is preferred in written language.

Example:
Mais un jour, pendant que je parlais avec un agriculteur, j’ai reçu un appel. (passé composé)
→ Mais un jour, pendant que je parlais avec un agriculteur, je reçus un appel. (passé simple)